Let’s get one thing clear from the beginning: the sight of people perched  on the edge of this extraordinary granite rock formation is one of Norway’s emblematic images but it’s also enough to give you chills down your spine if you’re not particularly fond of heights.

Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock) is a steep cliff plunging 604m to the Lysefjorden below and opposite the Kjerag plateau,with astonishingly uniform cliffs on three sides.

It’s quite simply a remarkable place, a vantage point unrivaled anywhere in the world and a photographer’s dream.

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Ranked by Business Insider as the Coolest Underground Place in the World, the Turda Salt Mine located in Transylvania, Romania, is the world’s largest salt mine museum, nowadays transformed into an underground amusement park.

The salt mine, which dates as far back as the 17th century, was used for everything from a cheese storage center to a bomb shelter in WWII. The massive mines were formed completely by hand and machine rather than by using explosives.

Throughout the cool interior there are a variety of mines, rooms and spaces to be explored. At almost 42 m down, Rudolph Mine offers a 180-seat amphitheater, a carousel, ping-pong tables, basketball hoops, mini-golf, and bowling. Old machinery still stands within the underground expanse and some of it is used to lead people on tours. Theresa Mine, at 35 m deep, provides access to a small lake where boats can be rented and a rotating wheel allows visitors to see the stalagmites throughout the cave. Finally, the Gisela Mine (the stationary room) functions as an area for health treatments that draws upon and takes advantage of the mine’s optimal climate.

Whether you want to escape the summer heat, you like eerie looking places or you are looking for a cool place to photograph, make sure you visit the Turda Salt Mine. It’s simply amazing!

 

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The Romanians have a long going tradition when it comes to horses, one that goes all way back to our ancestors. The horse played a key part in the development of our country and was used for agricultural labor, hunting and as a way of getting around.

In some Romanian villages you’ll still find young boys keeping alive the old ways of horseback riding wearing Romanian folk costumes. On special occasions like weddings or national holidays, they proudly put on their traditional costumes and parade through the village.

We convinced some lads from the village of Boiu near Sighisoara to take their horses and show us their riding skills and we were amazed how natural and easy going they were.

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We knew that our New Zeeland trip wouldn’t be complete without some “behind the scenes” photos. It’s our way of pulling the curtain on the photo-making secrets of our most successful trip to date.

We decided to show you (almost) everything: from the morning swim in the Pacific Ocean on the East coast to the evening swim on the same day in the Tasman Sea on the West coast, followed by our amazing off-road river driving experience where we got some seriously cool water splashes.

At times, hunger got the best of us. Luckily, we took the opportunity to experience the amazing kiwi lunch: fish&chips. After all, they do say that “hunger is the best cook”.

Nowadays, no photo trip is complete without taking at least one selfie. Throw in the Tongariro volcano and that’s a selfie we’re definitively proud of.

We truly had fun in New Zealand and hope some of the fun in these pictures will put a smile on your face too!

Don’t go anywhere as we’ll be back soon with other cool adventures!

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Boasting about 200 species, ranging from ten-metre-high tree ferns to flimsy 20 millimeters long ferns, it’s no wonder the fern is a symbol of New Zealand, along with the famous kiwi bird.

According to Māori legends, the silver fern once lived in the sea. It was asked to come and live in the forest to play a significant role in guiding the Māori people. Māori hunters and warriors used the silver underside of the fern leaves to find their way home. When bent over, the fronds would catch the moonlight and illuminate a path through the forest.

This distinctly New Zealand symbol is considered a badge of honor by the kiwi people, products and services that carry it and has been the symbol of New Zealand’s national rugby team since the 1880s.

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