The Romanians have a long going tradition when it comes to horses, one that goes all way back to our ancestors. The horse played a key part in the development of our country and was used for agricultural labor, hunting and as a way of getting around.

In some Romanian villages you’ll still find young boys keeping alive the old ways of horseback riding wearing Romanian folk costumes. On special occasions like weddings or national holidays, they proudly put on their traditional costumes and parade through the village.

We convinced some lads from the village of Boiu near Sighisoara to take their horses and show us their riding skills and we were amazed how natural and easy going they were.

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We knew that our New Zeeland trip wouldn’t be complete without some “behind the scenes” photos. It’s our way of pulling the curtain on the photo-making secrets of our most successful trip to date.

We decided to show you (almost) everything: from the morning swim in the Pacific Ocean on the East coast to the evening swim on the same day in the Tasman Sea on the West coast, followed by our amazing off-road river driving experience where we got some seriously cool water splashes.

At times, hunger got the best of us. Luckily, we took the opportunity to experience the amazing kiwi lunch: fish&chips. After all, they do say that “hunger is the best cook”.

Nowadays, no photo trip is complete without taking at least one selfie. Throw in the Tongariro volcano and that’s a selfie we’re definitively proud of.

We truly had fun in New Zealand and hope some of the fun in these pictures will put a smile on your face too!

Don’t go anywhere as we’ll be back soon with other cool adventures!

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Boasting about 200 species, ranging from ten-metre-high tree ferns to flimsy 20 millimeters long ferns, it’s no wonder the fern is a symbol of New Zealand, along with the famous kiwi bird.

According to Māori legends, the silver fern once lived in the sea. It was asked to come and live in the forest to play a significant role in guiding the Māori people. Māori hunters and warriors used the silver underside of the fern leaves to find their way home. When bent over, the fronds would catch the moonlight and illuminate a path through the forest.

This distinctly New Zealand symbol is considered a badge of honor by the kiwi people, products and services that carry it and has been the symbol of New Zealand’s national rugby team since the 1880s.

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The Punakaiki Pancake Rocks are definitively one of mother’s nature most impressive feats. This is one of the best places to feel the terrible force of the sea. The dramatic vertical water outbursts seem to be aiming for the sky as they rise high above the always-bustling Tasman Sea.

If you are a rainbow hunter, you must visit this place. This is your paradise. About every couple of seconds a rainbow appears and then shortly after disappears making way for a new one.

Make sure you are ready for a free shower while you’re there. It was quite nice for us but our cameras have undergone a thorough cleaning. Luckily, they are still working even to this day.

Punakaiki literally means “a spring of food”. Most likely the name comes from the 53 pubs built around it by the gold seekers.

Punakaiki is not just about pancake rocks and spectacular bursts of spray. At Punakaiki we discovered an incredible beach covered in fine black sand. A carpet made from the finest silk unfolded beneath our burned soles after a long day of traveling. It’s quite a unique sensation, we’ll give you that.

At nightfall, someone came and stole the beach. We thought it was the Tasmanian Devil, judging by all the stories we were hearing. The harsh reality was rather disappointing: it was just the high tide, going about doing what it does best each night.

Lucian Nistor’s photos

Dana Stavaru’s photos

Andrei Morar’s photos

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Following out close encounter with the seals, we headed to Aoraki Mt. Cook Alpine Lodge. Here you can find a whole resort dedicated to perhaps the most famous New Zealander, Sir Edmund Hillary (20 July 1919 – 11 January 2008). Even though New Zealand is a peaceful country, he however conquered something: on May 29 1953, he became the first climber confirmed as having reached the summit of Mount Everest. We won’t go into much detail about him, as a simple internet search will provide you with all the necessary information.

Before our departure, we have witnessed an avalanche of stones on one of the mountainsides. It was too far away to put us in danger, but close enough to catch it with the cameras lens.

From the tourist center, we followed along the Tasman River a winding road covered in ultra-fine dust. At the end of the road we finally arrived at none other than the Tasman Lake. The water that fills this lake and later on supplies the Tasman River originates from the Glacier called – you guessed it – Tasman Glacier. 

Here what intrigued us was the water’s color: azure with a milky twist. Add to this floating icebergs drifting away on the lake’s surface and you have quite a strange scenery.

 Lucian Nistor’s photos

Andrei Morar’s photos

Dana Stavaru’s photos

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